2015

Reflection on the General Election

So since my last post, Britain (well 24% of the electorate) voted for a Conservative government, Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband both resigned as party leaders and Nigel Farage didn’t win Thanet (Oh and he stepped down as leader too, but only for 3 days). With all that happened, many questions emerged like why did Labour lose the election? Why were the opinion polls so wrong? Many politicians and observers have given their opinions since the election results were announced but its fair to say, there are things which need to be investigated, particularly within the Labour Party. Did they lose their sense of direction? Is socialism dead?

It’s worth reading this commentary on Labour’s defeat.

To be fair, the campaigning Labour did throughout the course of the election was overwhelming, but as the results have shown, it didn’t extend beyond London. The party most importantly failed to defend their role in the 2008 financial crisis and allowed Cameron and crew to spit all over them. That is important because Labour is traditionally seen as economically incompetent. However, the message that Labour failed to deliver was that the financial crisis occurred on a global scale, and most probably would have happened if there had been a Conservative government in office at the time.

After the party’s defeat, many turned to Ed Miliband as the cause of the party’s failure, but that may have been a but too harsh. The thing is, everyone (including Labour party supporters and politicians) were quick to come up with the reasons why the party failed to win a majority, but if we all noticed these issues, why weren’t they addressed sooner rather than later? Whether it’s Miliband’s lack of persona or the awkward #Edstone, the party’s failure, it seems, lay at their inability to emulate their predecessor, Tony Blair. Now, i know many do not like to talk about Blair because he led us into the Iraq war and all, but you cannot question his leadership style. It was under Blair that the Conservatives had to go through three leaders (William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith & Michael Howard) before it found David Cameron who tried and succeeded in emulating Blair’s style, politically and charismatically. Let’s also not forget Blair’s ability to get Murdoch eating at the palm of his hand. But seriously, Blair is the only modern political leader in Britain who had been able to resonate with everyone, irrespective of social class. Miliband on the other hand created a campaign based on an ‘us vs them’ which could have worked, but there is the small issue of people wanting to appear better off than they actually are. In short, in order for Labour to be a successful opposition party, it now needs to learn how to emulate the Conservatives (not by being an upper class snobbish party) but by recognising why the electorate seem to stick to the devil they know, and how they would create change for everyone, not just the working man.

We’ve all voted. We know who’s in government, but what now? What does a Conservative government mean for all of us? Well, for starters we no longer have Nick Clegg and the liberals to halt the passing of legislature that would be detrimental to ordinary folk like the axing of the Human Rights Act which would be replaced by a British Bill of Rights according to the party’s manifesto. If this specific mandate were to become law, it would mean that citizens would no longer be able to go to the European Court of Human Rights to appeal a court decision made by the UK Supreme Courts, giving legal sovereignty to UK courts. The idea of the UK Supreme Court having the final word has also evoked fear of corruption between politicians and judges.

Other Conservative Party policies that are likely to go ahead include:

  • Referendum on the UK’s membership in the EU
  • More devolved powers to Scotland – ‘The Scotland Bill’
  • Reducing the annual benefits cap by £3,000 to £23,000 and removing housing benefit from under-21s on jobseeker’s allowance
  • Taking out of income tax anyone working 30 hours a week on minimum wage by linking the personal allowance to the national minimum wage
  • New education bill to “force coasting schools to accept new leadership”
  • A housing bill to extend the right to buy to 1.3 million housing association tenants
  • A bill to double free childcare for working parents of three- and four-year-olds.

One thing’s for sure, Labour and other anti-Tory individuals and groups have to become more united than ever over the next five years as more cuts and austerity measures are expected to be rolled out. It will also be interesting to see how the Labour leadership contest plays out. It is disappointing that Chuka Ummuna pulled out of the contest as i think he would of been a great candidate, but what Labour now needs is someone who can shake things up a bit like Tony Blair. The leader of the Labour Party needs to be able to know what direction the party is going in, defend its economic history and fight for the people – the working and middle classes. Does it need to be centrist? Possibly, considering the left stance Miliband had clearly didn’t resonate. In short, Labour needs to redefine its political position in terms of what and who it stands for. And fast.

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Cameron Returns (Again…)

Okay, so last week, i wrote a post on Cameron’s early return from his holidays amidst the crisis in Iraq. This week Cameron returned from his holiday in Cornwall following the beheading of American journalist, James Foley.

His return did not last long however, as he stayed a short while to coordinate  with his fellow ministers in the manhunt for the jihadi who’s accent resembles the English accent. There is footage of the “brutal and barbaric act” in which you can see the violent act being committed but for obvious reasons, i will not be putting the video up.

In response to the death of Mr Foley, David Cameron said he was “deeply shocked” – this still didn’t sway him to recall Parliament, stating it is “not on the cards” despite growing pressure from many MPs, both in his party as well as within the opposition. It seems the PM is determined to not let anything ruin his holiday. Even increasing threats from extremists. And let’s not forget the thousands of people dying in Iraq and Gaza. But hey, if a holiday is more important…

Cameron posted this picture on Twitter “Stunning images of #MyWales proudly being shared ahead of @NATOWales. Here’s mine of Porth Oer, Llyn Peninsula.”

Cameron did say though that he was prepared to consider “even tougher” laws to counter terrorism. Erm, not that i’m Prime Minister or anything (not yet anyway), but surely there are more pressing issues than just brushing this horrific act aside? He did take the time to “condemn the barbaric and brutal at that has taken place, and let’s be clear what this act is – it is an act of murder, and murder without any justification.”

“We have not identified the individual responsible, but from what we have seen it looks increasingly likely that it is a British citizen.

This is deeply shocking but we do know that far too many British citizens have travelled to Syria to take part in this extremism and violence. And what we must do is redouble all our efforts to stop people from going.”

Clearly this statement isn’t enough, as proven by former  Liberal Democrat leader, Sir Menzies Campbell, commenting that the conflict in Iraq was so serious that Parliament should have been recalled “weeks ago”. Sir Campbell is not alone in his thinking – Conservative MP, Bob Stewart, said “If we are talking about putting military forces on the ground, even for training purposes, then I don’t think there is any choice but to recall Parliament.”

Does Cameron’s lack of duty make him look weak? Probably, but in the run up to next year’s general election, things in Westminster always slow down, especially in government. Cameron and Miliband are both focusing on retaining as well as gaining voter support, however, with national and international crises such as those presented to us on a daily basis, wouldn’t it be better to gain support by showing your duty as a leader?

And it seems good ol’ Dave isn’t the only one having fun in the sun as it seems President Barack Obama is also on holiday in the exclusive Martha’s Vineyard on the East Coast of America. Easy for them to just jet off into the sunset and forget all the troubles that face us all daily. -Sigh-

Then i started thinking. Of course we all deserve a holiday, it’s a given especially in a job and even in education. But in a job so important as being the leader of a country, when do you say ‘i need to serve my country’ and sacrifice your own personal needs? As an aspiring politician myself, i would rather do my duty and do my utmost best to protect my country rather than just be downright selfish. Do i think Cameron and Obama are being selfish? Yes i do. Okay, i know I’ve just been biased but you were thinking it too. I say this because after returning for a few hours, Mr Cameron jetted off back to Cornwall whilst efforts continued to identify the British terrorist who beheaded the American journalist.

It seems like Dave is just letting everyone else do the work while he takes a break. It’s absurd! (Sorry, biased again)

So let’s hear from you. Do you think leaders such as David Cameron and Barack Obama should be on holiday knowing that there are current crises occurring which need their undivided attention? Isn’t it their responsibility to know when they are needed and do the ‘right’ thing and sacrifice their personal wants for the country’s needs? Should they not have known that this is a disadvantage of the job when they campaigned for the position?

Let me know your thoughts by dropping a comment in that pretty box below!

First Mayor of London, Now MP…

In a speech last week, London Mayor Boris Johnson announced that he will be attempting to stand as an MP in next year’s general election. He finally cleared much speculation, but of course this introduces a conflict of interest. Many question (including myself) how he will manage the two roles as it will conflict with his job as London mayor. With the responsibilities that come with both roles, it is no doubt that the quality fulfilled in one role will lack, having a tremendous effect on the capital as well as his possible future constituents (which is rumoured to be South Ruislip where former deputy chief whip of the Tory party Sir John Randall is retiring).

Boris’ potential election as MP could mean he would be able to run for the Conservative leadership after David Cameron. Is this all a Tory plot? Well, it’s no secret that Mr Johnson is quite a marmite character and becoming leader of the party would give them quite a few popularity gains. Or maybe the party have realised how out of touch they are becoming with the public, proving Cameron to be weaker than he’d like to make out? Hmm… I smell something fishy. Or should I say i smell something Etonian…

Being ever so modest, good ol’ Boris said “It is highly likely I will be unsuccessful in that venture. You should never underestimate the possibility of things going badly wrong. But I will try that. But one thing is I will serve out my mandate as mayor of London.”

In response to Boris’ announcement, David Cameron tweeted whilst on holiday in Portugal “Great news that Boris plans to stand at next year’s general election – I’ve always said I want my star players on the pitch.” ‘Star players’ eh? It’s politics Dave, not a football match, jheeze.

But what’s the fuss? For the last two years, despite being grilled by the media, Boris Johnson has always denied he will ever run for Parliament. Take a look…

May 2012 – “It could be taken for granted that I [Boris] would not be after a Commons seat in 2015.” Speaking on Radio 4’s Today Programme

March 2013 – “I am sticking to the job I was elected to do in 2012 and 2008. I am very privileged to be here. They have never made me such an offer.” Speaking on LBC radio

December 2013 – “No, because I have got a huge amount of work to do and I can’t see how I could. I have got to go on and deliver a colossal amount of stuff in London.” Responding to journalists asking about his plans to run for parliament

July 2014 – “As I said about a billion times, being the mayor of London is the best job in British politics and it’s what I want to do.”

Boris Johnson was previously an MP for Henley between 2001 and 2008 and it seems he may be making a comeback. I think the question on everybody’s lips is why the sudden admittance? After claiming being Mayor of London is the “best job in politics”, why then seek more responsibility? It’s quite mind boggling (to me anyway), but i do believe there is a hidden agenda in all of this.

Remember, nothing goes without nothing. Or is it nothing goes without something?  Basically, something fishy is going on and I intend to keep you all posted. ‘Till next time…